A Token Of Love /Written by Janice Tindle

“I’ll never take it off!”

Mary Elizabeth giggled with delight as he put it on her wrist. It was the most beautiful bracelet she had ever seen. It was so well made, it looked like the real thing. But she knew her beloved James could never afford real pearls and diamonds. Even so, it was for her, a treasure beyond words.

“It will have to do, until I can get you a proper engagement ring.”

But she didn’t respond. She was too transfixed on her gift, as she moved it around her wrist. James was pleased. He had spent all he had on the Jomaz piece. The man at the store had been right. She did indeed love it! But not solely because it was beautiful, but because it came from her James. And anything he would have given her would have been perfect when accompanying the words,

” Darling, I love you. I don’t want any other girl but you. Will you be mine til the end of time?”

The year was 1947. James eventually did purchase an engagement ring and she wore the bracelet on her wedding day. They had five children, four boys and a girl. When the girl, Molly was sixteen, her mother told her,

“When I die, this will belong to you, my darling.”
” I’ll never take it off, Mother!”

And so they lived happily. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary with their children and their families. In the family portrait Mary Elizabeth was sitting down front next to her beloved James hand in hand , the bracelet on her wrist. When they cut the anniversary cake, she told the photographer to be sure to get a good shot of the bracelet.

As the years went by, they grew older, but their love remained as fresh as it was in their youth. When she turned ninety, Mary Elizabeth passed away. Her beloved James had gone two years earlier. Her children and her grandchildren and her great grandchildren were at her side. With tears in her eyes, Molly unclasped the bracelet and slowly put it on her wrist. She kissed her sweet mother on the cheek and whispered,

” I’ ll never take it off”.

Molly was unmarried at the time her mother died. She wore the bracelet as a symbol of the love between her parents. Perhaps the reason she hadn’t married was that it was hard to find someone as wonderful as her father. He had raised his sons to follow his example and they too had watched the blessed union and learned. They all chose wonderfu women. But Molly was having a harder time finding the right man. Every time a man would show her some interest, the bracelet was there to remind her that true love was worth the wait.

Then one day it happened. Joe entered her life. He was good and kind and had all the qualities her parents would have wanted for a son-in-law. Molly fell in love. Soon they married and just like her parents and her brothers, Molly had found a good mate. But they had only one son, from Joe’s first marriage. So who would wear the bracelet next?

She thought long and hard. There were many nieces and sisters-in-law. Which one was worthy? They all were. However, Molly wanted to give it to her son for his bride when he choose one. So Molly came up with an idea. She would start a new tradition. She went online and found a beautiful vintage bracelet for each one. She invited them all to her house for a luncheon and presented the gifts. They all loved the idea of having their own family tradition to pass down for generations to come.

Molly lived a good life with Joe. They made it to their twenty fifth wedding anniversary. Molly did just as her mother, devoted her life to her family. Then one night Molly passed away in her sleep. Her husband took the bracelet off and handed it to his son, Joe Jr. He too, is slow to marry, waiting for the right one. As a result, the bracelet now lies in a velvet box waiting for that special someone who’ll say;

“I’ll never take it off!”.

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About janicetindle.com

NOTICE: NOTHING, and I mean NOTHING, from my website janicetindle.com may be use without a request in writing to me. Permission, if granted, will be done in writing. Failure to do so will result in possible prosecution. I am the sole owner of my words and at point of publication on this site it is copyrighted as mine. - copyright 2012 Janice Tindle In 2010, I suffered a traumatic brain injury and other injuries when hit by an under insured driver. It changed my life. I now live with Dystonia, a rare and painful neurologal disorder that causes involuntary muscle spasms and abnormal posturing. There is no treatment or cure. The best one can do is treat the symptoms. You can learn more at DMRF.org. I try to write about people and things that help and inspire my readers. You can find more of my story by going to helphopelive.org. I am also on Facebook, where I have five pages, Pain Brain -Anti- Inflammatory Foods, Brain Tears, The Positive Posters Page, Traumatic Brain Injury Resources Page, Janice Tindle- Writer. I am also on Twitter and LinkedIn. Simply Google my name and my published articles should appear. I've been published in Fearless Caregiver, Today's Caregiver, TBI Hope and Inspiration Magazine, The Mighty.com, and several other publications. I am currently a caregiver for my dear mother. My hope is to someday finish my books, "Get Back Up!" and "Galicia's Granite" during my mother's lifetime. Your interest in my care, recovery and writing is greatly appreciated. Thank you. Comments are welcome.
This entry was posted in duty, essay, family, human interest, humanity, inspirational, life changing events, love, marriage, motivational, musings, people, self, short story, thought provoking, tindle and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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